Scientists are human too

June 11, 2019

 

The Native Scientist project “Wissenschaftler sind auch nur Menschen”, translated to English as “Scientists are human too”, was a success.  This was another pioneering project of Native Scientist, developed and delivered in partnership with the Goethe-Institut London.

 

“Scientists are human too” was a project that took place in the school year of 2018/2019 and which involved scientists and students from various countries. At the start of the project, Native Scientist invited six German scientists living in different European countries to write a story about themselves and their careers. These biographic stories were then included in six booklets, where a step-by-step experiment was added, to be carried out by school students. The booklets were used by science teachers and German teachers in collaboration, to promote the integrated learning of language and science. At the end of the process, the results of the experiments performed by the students were presented to the scientists who wrote the stories and experiments of the booklets. This was a great opportunity for pupils to learn more about science and the life of a scientist.

 

A total of 202 students, aged 13-19 years old, from seven different European countries participated in the project and reported a positive impact and a better understanding of science and of the work of scientists. One of the students said: “It was fun and we should do something like this again.” Another one added: “It was extremely interesting and very enjoyable.”

 

Teachers also valued the experience: “Great project to involve the students in modern, up to date science and to open their eyes to studying abroad“. Our scientists rated the project as a very good experience: “Projects like this are very important to help young people to understand science more effectively.” A full report of the project is available here.

 

Kerstin Beer, coordinator of the project commented: “I can say that I’m thrilled to have been part of this impressive project as coordinator and editor. I would like to thank Native Scientist and the Goethe-Instituts in Northern Europe, especially the Goethe-Institut London, as well as all pupils and teachers. Many thanks also to our scientists Henning Kirschenmann, Ingo Mueller-Wodarg, Katja Spiess, Stephanie Zihms, Matthias Kremer and Viola Nähse.”

 

Joana Moscoso and Tatiana Correia, founders of Native Scientist added: “To be able to work together with cultural institutions like Goethe-Institut and socially-conscious researchers is one of the best parts of our work. To develop and deliver projects like this one fills us with joy and we are certain that we can only achieve lasting and sustainable impact by fostering partnerships like this.”

 

The booklets produced for this project are now available online and can be accessed by anyone wishing to promote science in German. If you use these resources at home or at school, feel free to get in touch with us by emailing Kerstin Beer at kerstin.beer@nativescientist.com.

 

 

About Native Scientist

Native Scientist is an award-winning European-wide non-profit organisation that promotes cultural diversity in science, education and society. Native Scientist provides science and language workshops, science communication training, and bespoke projects for various institutions, including schools, universities and embassies. The work developed connects pupils with scientists to foster science and language literacy through role modelling and science and language integrated learning. Founded in 2013, their work reaches over 1,200 pupils a year and they count with a network of over 1,000 international scientists.

 

 

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